DISASTER RESPONSE MISSION: NWA STATUS UPDATE

Sheep Dog Impact Assistance is coordinating from the Center for Nonprofits (1200 W. Walnut St., Rogers, AR 72756) parking lot. The back lot where the Sheep Dog vehicles are parked. There will be a daily meet-up and safety brief at 08:30 AM, every day through the weekend. To go out with a team be at the safety briefing.

We will have volunteer t-shirts for you but supplies are limited, if you have previous DRM attire please wear that. Please wear jeans and heavy shoes, bring gloves and if you have any personal safety equipment.

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Disaster Response Mission: NWA Status Update

In the aftermath of the recent severe storm, the Sheep Dog Impact Assistance (SDIA) Disaster Response Team has been diligently monitoring the damage and is actively coordinating relief efforts. Northwest Arkansas is our home and this community is very important to us. Our teams will be working together with our local first responders and emergency management personnel to help any way we can.
You must register to assist us on our DRM mission.

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Join us in Dallas!

We’re looking for dedicated volunteers to help make this event a success. Whether you can lend a hand for an hour or the entire weekend, your support makes a difference. Let’s bring all of Sheep Dog Nation together to honor the sacrifices of our military, veterans, first responders, and their families. Our goal is to see more than 200 volunteers wearing our t-shirts at this year’s event. Each volunteer will receive a shirt for each day you are at the event. SDIA has limited lodging accommodations available to support volunteers on a first come, first served basis.

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What to do During a Winter Storm

What to do During a Winter Storm

Guidelines

Listen to your radio, television, or NOAA Weather Radio for weather reports and emergency information. Eat regularly and drink ample fluids, but avoid caffeine and alcohol. Conserve fuel, if necessary, by keeping your residence cooler than normal. Temporarily close off heat to some rooms. If the pipes freeze, remove any insulation or layers of newspapers and wrap pipes in rags. Completely open all faucets and pour hot water over the pipes, starting where they were most exposed to the cold (or where the cold was most likely to penetrate). Maintain ventilation when using kerosene heaters to avoid build-up of toxic fumes. Refuel kerosene heaters outside and keep them at least three feet from flammable objects.

If you are outdoors

Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on a heart attack—a major cause of death in the winter. If you must shovel snow, stretch before going outside. Cover your mouth. Protect your lungs from extremely cold air by covering your mouth when...

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What to do Before a Winter Storm

What to do Before Winter Storms and Extreme Cold Add the following supplies to your disaster supplies kit:

Rock salt to melt ice on walkways Sand to improve traction Snow shovels and other snow removal equipment.

Prepare your home and family

Prepare for possible isolation in your home by having sufficient heating fuel; regular fuel sources may be cut off. For example, store a good supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stove. Winterize your home to extend the life of your fuel supply by insulating walls and attics, caulking and weather-stripping doors and windows, and installing storm windows or covering windows with plastic. Winterize your house, barn, shed or any other structure that may provide shelter for your family, neighbors, livestock or equipment. Clear rain gutters; repair roof leaks and cut away tree branches that could fall on a house or other structure during a storm. Insulate pipes with insulation or newspapers and plastic and allow faucets to drip a little during cold weather to avoid...

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What to do Before a Tornado

What to do Before a Tornado Be alert to changing weather conditions.

Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. Look for approaching storms. Look for the following danger signs: -Dark, often greenish sky -Large hail -A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating) -Loud roar, similar to a freight train.

If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately. // ...

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Tornado Information

Tornado Information Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms, tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds. A tornado appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles per hour. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Every state is at some risk from this hazard. Some tornadoes are clearly visible, while rain or nearby low-hanging clouds obscure others. Occasionally, tornadoes develop so rapidly that little, if any, advance warning is possible. Before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become very still. A cloud of debris can mark the location of a tornado even if a funnel is not visible. Tornadoes generally occur near the trailing edge of a thunderstorm. It is not uncommon to see clear, sunlit skies behind a tornado. The following are facts about tornadoes:

They may strike quickly, with little or...

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Chemical Threats

Chemical Threats Chemical agents are poisonous vapors, aerosols, liquids, and solids that have toxic effects on people, animals, or plants. They can be released by bombs or sprayed from aircraft, boats, and vehicles. They can be used as a liquid to create a hazard to people and the environment. Some chemical agents may be odorless and tasteless. They can have an immediate effect (a few seconds to a few minutes) or a delayed effect (2 to 48 hours). While potentially lethal, chemical agents are difficult to deliver in lethal concentrations. Outdoors, the agents often dissipate rapidly. Chemical agents also are difficult to produce. A chemical attack could come without warning. Signs of a chemical release include people having difficulty breathing; experiencing eye irritation; losing coordination; becoming nauseated; or having a burning sensation in the nose, throat, and lungs. Also, the presence of many dead insects or birds may indicate a chemical agent release. // ...

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